Tits, Heroines and Stephen King

A STORY ON HOW TO TELL YOUR LIFE STORY

Everyone has a story to tell. Those folks who always moan, ‘my life isn’t interesting enough,’ they too have a story to tell. And it may be a good idea to write that story, if for any other reason but to pass it on to your relatives, so generations of your family you’ll never meet have something to learn from. But, that’s another podcast.

If you did tell your story, how would you do it? Would it be a straight up autobiography? Would you want someone to write your biography? Maybe, you’d prefer a memoir.

How about this idea – a graphic novel.

StoryTits

The Story of My Tits can be listed as a comic, or graphic novel, but author Jennifer Hayden likes the idea of a graphic memoir.

The book takes you through Hayden’s life from her youth through adulthood and parenthood. From the start it’s apparent that she fascinated and frustrated with one part of her anatomy, her breasts.

Story-of-My-Tits-009-I-thought-they-were-the-answer-PANELDuring her youth Hayden struggled with the fact that her breasts did not develop as quickly as many of the other girls around her, especially her sister. And, this caused her to go through an unsettling journey through her adolescence, at times hating then eventually accepting her body.

The fact that you’re reading this story in comic book boxes doesn’t take away from the poignant and powerful emotions Hayden explores in her youth and adulthood.

At one moment you find yourself feeling for this young girl who is so insecure with her body. Then, in her adulthood, she gains her breasts only to lose them. And it’s not just her. Hayden’s mother also experiences the pains of going through the process of losing one of her breasts.

Story of my Tits 048 she looked untouchable PAGEHayden’s story is entertaining because it’s relatable. It’s a story about our sister, our wife and our mother. The art has a warmth to it because it’s not glossy or perfect, but instead edgy, scratchy and real.

My conversation with Hayden goes beyond the art of writing a memoir, especially in the format she’s chosen. It’s also a lesson in taking new avenues to get one’s work noticed.

You can hear the entire interview, unedited, at Soundcloud.

THE ART OF CREATING GREAT CHARACTERS

Grace Flynn is quickly becoming one of the biggest commodities in fantasy fiction. She’s an 18th Century heroine loosely based on some of history’s most notorious female pirates.

Flynn3

Flynn is the creation of P.L. McCall II. He took inspiration from people like the pirate Ann Bonny.

Flynn is the typical anti-hero. In Dr. Daedalus, The Devil’s Army, she’s on the brink of being executed, and is wanted by both England and France.

McCall says creating a great character is like starting with a mold you have to shape the way you want it. But, to make it a successful character, in other words marketable, McCall says you have to approach it with an MBA mentality.

You have to start a grassroots campaign. Even Superman and Batman and the characters we just know, had to start somewhere.

McCall, also known as PLMII (pronounced Pluh-MEE) is a writer and publisher. He’s written novels and other stories like: Dr. Daedalus, the Devil’s Army, Crimson Scarver, Vatican’s Vampires and a fantasy anthology titled “PHIL”.

In our interview he not only talks about the keys to creating great heroes and heroines, but also the all important villain.

You can hear the entire interview with P.L.McCall at SoundCloud.

Music for the podcast comes from Aviscerall, Jahzzar, Thiaz Itch and Baba Brinkman.

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